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Size Chart

Women
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    Chest
    (cm)
    74
    to
    77
    78
    to
    81
    82
    to
    85
    86
    to
    89
    90
    to
    93
    94
    to
    97
    Waist
    (cm)
    59
    to
    62
    63
    to
    66
    67
    to
    70
    71
    to
    74
    75
    to
    78
    79
    to
    82
    Hip
    (cm)
    83
    to
    86
    87
    to
    90
    91
    to
    94
    95
    to
    98
    99
    to
    102
    103
    to
    107
  • INT XXS XS S M L XL
    GER 32 34 36 38 40 42
    US 0-2 4 6 8 10 12
    UK 6 8 10 12 14 16
    ITA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    FRA 34 36 38 40 42 44
    JAP 5 7 9 11 13 15
Men
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    Chest
    (cm)
    86
    to
    89
    90
    to
    93
    94
    to
    97
    98
    to
    101
    102
    to
    105
    106
    to
    109
    Waist
    (cm)
    73
    to
    76
    77
    to
    80
    81
    to
    84
    85
    to
    88
    89
    to
    92
    93
    to
    96
    Hip
    (cm)
    87
    to
    90
    91
    to
    94
    95
    to
    98
    99
    to
    102
    103
    to
    106
    107
    to
    109
  • INT XS S M L XL XXL
    GER 44 46 48 50 52 54
    US 34 36 38 40 42 44
    UK 34 36 38 40 42 44
    ITA 44 46 48 50 52 54
    FRA 38 40 42 44 46 48
    JAP 1 2 3 4 5 6
  • CM 72 77 82 87 92
    INCH 28 30 32 34 36

    (Approximate values)

A day in Los Angeles

with

Austin Millz

Sometimes there’s music you can’t just not dance to. Bouncing beats that are going straight to your body and leaving you with nothing but endorphins. This is exactly the kind of music Austin Millz is known for. Growing up in Harlem, New York, the American Musician, Producer and DJ was always surrounded by danceable tunes. It was only natural that Austin, after studying Journalism, turned not to writing but to music and made the leap into the business. Since then, he has been conquering festivals like Coachella and playing music on the rooftops of the coolest cities in the world.

We talked to him about his music inspirations, how to connect with a younger audience and what it’s like to move from New York to Los Angeles.

The
Interview

What music did you grow up with and, what kind of music inspired you to make your own music?

I grew up around a lot of very danceable music – funk, disco, and R&B as well as a lot of Puerto Rican music called merengue and salsa. I also played the saxophone and piano while growing up – so I was always around a lot of music inspiration.

How would you describe your music?

Most of my music is a euphoric dancefloor, summertime feel-good music. In terms of where I’m right now in my career, that’s the feeling my music gives. But I feel music is a career, so my next project could feel differently. It’s a good journey – it doesn’t necessarily mean I’m going to sound like this forever.

What do you need to feel inspired and creative?

I need to enjoy life, I need to be in an environment, I need to have experiences, to feel different emotions. I can’t just always be in the studio every day because I need to feel a real-world type of situation to get inspired to create the sonics to life.

How do you tend to start producing a track in your studio?

I usually start with cords or a melody, not the drums. Sometimes I have a certain type of sound and I mess around with it. Then I go for the groove, which is the drums and the rhythm part. That’s how I usually start. When I’m in sessions with singers I pick their brain to see where they’re at and just have a conversation before starting the music. And then we bounce off ideas, so we can have a collaborative process.

You play in different surroundings like on rooftops, at the beach or in the desert. Which other locations are on your bucket list?

I want to hit all the wonders of the world. That was my initial plan when I started doing that concept, I wanted to just travel around the world and have music coincide with the environment. And then the pandemic happened. So, I was like “Alright, I have to think on my toes”. I started playing on rooftops and the rooftops became a thing. But I feel like I still have so many things I want to do.

When you are DJing, all you want to do is make people dance – how do you connect with your audience when you play live?

When I play live, I get into a whole other zone. For me, music is the connecting thing that brings me and the audience together. I love to have people go on a journey with me and feel all types of emotions. It’s like you sign up to allow me to conduct this train. We’re on this ride, and just let the music take it away.

You have a huge fan base on TikTok. Do you think being present on TikTok is mandatory for musicians to connect with younger audiences?

Sometimes people are almost scared when it comes to new things and don’t really want to take a chance. I do meet musicians and people who don’t want to go to TikTok because it jeopardizes their brand and integrity. I think for TikTok, you should just be authentic and genuine to yourself, creating content that’s true to you, not just following trends. It’s tough to figure out that sweet spot of doing something that represents you, but at the same time resonates with the audience and the youth, the new generation. You’ve got to find out what your thing is, what makes you you, and then you can do that on TikTok.

How would you describe the music scene in Los Angeles?

Los Angeles has always been a melting pot for a lot of creatives. When they want to make that next step, they move to L.A. It’s a resurgence of a lot of people – their home, their local area. It has a lot of transplants here, but for the most part it’s very collaborative. I feel like this new generation of creators wants to work together, because they realize you’re just helping one another. It’s not a competitive thing.

You moved from New York to Los Angeles about three years ago – how has that helped your music career?

I met a lot of great people out here, and I finally found my sound when I moved to L.A. When I was in New York, I was making music, but I was just sending over emails to artists – I wasn’t really getting to collaborate in person, and I think collaboration in person is key for my career and that’s where I flourish. It’s amplified my career and my growth moving out here, and it’s made my music warmer.

What was the difference between your typical routine day, when you were in New York compared to the one you now have in Los Angeles?

I feel like I’ve become more intentional in L.A. and have more of routine than in New York. New York has a faster mentality and is a faster workplace. I was more on the move in New York, because in this city a lot more is going on in terms of the people and their energy.

From stores to lunch spots or places you visit in the nature: would you like to tell us about your favourite spots in Los Angeles?

There are so many stores I love. Buffalo Exchange is a cool place, for example. I really love these random Mexican food trucks, where they make tacos. I also love the landmarks like the Universal City Overlook, you can just see the whole city and the mountains. Sometimes I like just chilling and resetting on the beach. Then I go to Manhattan Beach, because it’s not as crowded as Venice or Santa Monica.

What are you three favourite songs that represent the lifestyle in Los Angeles the most?

“Off the Wall” by Michael Jackson, “Lovely Day” by Bill Withers and “Good Times” by Chic!

What music did you grow up with and, what kind of music inspired you to make your own music?

I grew up around a lot of very danceable music – funk, disco, and R&B as well as a lot of Puerto Rican music called merengue and salsa. I also played the saxophone and piano while growing up – so I was always around a lot of music inspiration.

How would you describe your music?

Most of my music is a euphoric dancefloor, summertime feel-good music. In terms of where I’m right now in my career, that’s the feeling my music gives. But I feel music is a career, so my next project could feel differently. It’s a good journey – it doesn’t necessarily mean I’m going to sound like this forever.

What do you need to feel inspired and creative?

I need to enjoy life, I need to be in an environment, I need to have experiences, to feel different emotions. I can’t just always be in the studio every day because I need to feel a real-world type of situation to get inspired to create the sonics to life.

How do you tend to start producing a track in your studio?

I usually start with cords or a melody, not the drums. Sometimes I have a certain type of sound and I mess around with it. Then I go for the groove, which is the drums and the rhythm part. That’s how I usually start. When I’m in sessions with singers I pick their brain to see where they’re at and just have a conversation before starting the music. And then we bounce off ideas, so we can have a collaborative process.

You play in different surroundings like on rooftops, at the beach or in the desert. Which other locations are on your bucket list?

I want to hit all the wonders of the world. That was my initial plan when I started doing that concept, I wanted to just travel around the world and have music coincide with the environment. And then the pandemic happened. So, I was like “Alright, I have to think on my toes”. I started playing on rooftops and the rooftops became a thing. But I feel like I still have so many things I want to do.

When you are DJing, all you want to do is make people dance – how do you connect with your audience when you play live?

When I play live, I get into a whole other zone. For me, music is the connecting thing that brings me and the audience together. I love to have people go on a journey with me and feel all types of emotions. It’s like you sign up to allow me to conduct this train. We’re on this ride, and just let the music take it away.

You have a huge fan base on TikTok. Do you think being present on TikTok is mandatory for musicians to connect with younger audiences?

Sometimes people are almost scared when it comes to new things and don’t really want to take a chance. I do meet musicians and people who don’t want to go to TikTok because it jeopardizes their brand and integrity. I think for TikTok, you should just be authentic and genuine to yourself, creating content that’s true to you, not just following trends. It’s tough to figure out that sweet spot of doing something that represents you, but at the same time resonates with the audience and the youth, the new generation. You’ve got to find out what your thing is, what makes you you, and then you can do that on TikTok.

How would you describe the music scene in Los Angeles?

Los Angeles has always been a melting pot for a lot of creatives. When they want to make that next step, they move to L.A. It’s a resurgence of a lot of people – their home, their local area. It has a lot of transplants here, but for the most part it’s very collaborative. I feel like this new generation of creators wants to work together, because they realize you’re just helping one another. It’s not a competitive thing.

You moved from New York to Los Angeles about three years ago – how has that helped your music career?

I met a lot of great people out here, and I finally found my sound when I moved to L.A. When I was in New York, I was making music, but I was just sending over emails to artists – I wasn’t really getting to collaborate in person, and I think collaboration in person is key for my career and that’s where I flourish. It’s amplified my career and my growth moving out here, and it’s made my music warmer.

What was the difference between your typical routine day, when you were in New York compared to the one you now have in Los Angeles?

I feel like I’ve become more intentional in L.A. and have more of routine than in New York. New York has a faster mentality and is a faster workplace. I was more on the move in New York, because in this city a lot more is going on in terms of the people and their energy.

From stores to lunch spots or places you visit in the nature: would you like to tell us about your favourite spots in Los Angeles?

There are so many stores I love. Buffalo Exchange is a cool place, for example. I really love these random Mexican food trucks, where they make tacos. I also love the landmarks like the Universal City Overlook, you can just see the whole city and the mountains. Sometimes I like just chilling and resetting on the beach. Then I go to Manhattan Beach, because it’s not as crowded as Venice or Santa Monica.

What are you three favourite songs that represent the lifestyle in Los Angeles the most?

“Off the Wall” by Michael Jackson, “Lovely Day” by Bill Withers and “Good Times” by Chic!

Drag & swipe to read

Austin Millz

Austin Millz

New Smooth Nappa Sneakers Low

365 $

New Vigo Tapered Pants

  • Regular / 
  • Yarn Dyed / 
  • Italian Fabric
345 $

New Pure Virgin Wool Relaxed Blazer

570 $

New College T-Shirt

98 $

New College Sweater Vest

255 $

New A BETTER BLUE Worker Jacket

435 $

New Nanaimo Straight Pants

  • Straight
285 $

New X-Lent Tapered Jeans

  • Relaxed / 
  • A BETTER BLUE / 
  • 12 oz.
290 $
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